3 weeks ago

What Is Mortons Neuroma

Overview

Morton neuromaInterdigital neuroma (Morton?s Neuroma) of the foot includes common, paroxysmal, neuralgia affecting the web spaces of the toes. It involves entrapment neuropathy (nerve compression) of the common digital nerve below and between the metatarsal heads, typically between the third and the fourth metatarsal heads. The pain is most commonly felt between the third and fourth toes but can also occur in the area between the second and third toes.

Causes

The exact cause is as yet unclear. However there are a number of theories. Some expert s believe problems with the design of the foot makes some people more prone to Morton?s neuroma. Having flat feet or a high arch for example encourages the foot to slide forwards which can put excess pressure on the metatarsals. Bunions and hammer toes also increase the likelihood of developing Morton?s. However simply wearing high heels or any form of tight shoes that put pressure on the bones in the feet can also lead to a Morton?s . Typically the condition comes on between the age of 40 and 50. It is far more common in women than men - three out of four sufferers are women.

Symptoms

What are the symptoms of Morton?s neuroma? A sharp or stinging pain between the toes when standing or walking. Pain in the forefoot between the toes. Swelling between the toes. Tingling (?pins and needles?) and numbness. Feeling like there is a ?bunched up sock? or a pebble or marble under the ball of the foot.

Diagnosis

The diagnosis of a Morton's neuroma can usually be made by the doctor when the history of pain suggests it and the examination elicits the symptoms. The foot is generally tender when the involved area is compressed and symptoms of pain and sometimes tingling can be elicited when the sides of the foot are squeezed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound testing can be used to confirm the diagnosis if necessary.

Non Surgical Treatment

Anti-inflammatory drugs may be recommended to dull the pain and lessen swelling. Neuropathic pain medications such as the antionvulsants and / or antidepressants may be tried as well. Many are able to recover from this issue at home by icing the area, resting the feet, and by avoiding wearing narrow or tight shoes. If these remedies do not work to alleviate symptoms, the doctor may give special devices to separate the toes and avoid the squeezing of the nerve. Steroid injections may reduce pain and swelling. Surgery may be required if these do not help.Morton

Surgical Treatment

Operative treatment of Morton?s neuroma should be entertained only after failure of nonoperative management. Standard operative treatment involves identifying the nerve and cutting (resecting) it proximal to the point where it is irritate/injured. This is usually done through an incision on the top (dorsal) aspect of the foot, although in rare instances, an incision on the sole (plantar) aspect of the foot maybe used. An incision on the sole of the foot works very well, unless an excessive scar forms in which case it can be problematic. Some physicians will attempt to treat Morton?s neuroma by releasing the intermetatarsal ligament and freeing the nerve of local scar tissue. This may also be beneficial.

2 months ago

Accessory Ossicle Navicular Pain

Overview

Accessory navicular syndrome occurs when a type II accessory navicular (or "os tibiale externum") becomes painful due to movement across the pseudojoint between the ossicle and the navicular bone. The syndrome presents on MRI with bone marrow oedema signal (hypointense T1, hyperintense T2/STIR) in both the accessory ossicle and navicular. It can be inferred on musculoskeletal ultrasound if a patient's pain is located at a type II accessory navicular and the patient is tender to transducer pressure. Ultrasound can also be useful to compare with the contralateral side.

Accessory Navicular

Causes

People who have an accessory navicular often are unaware of the condition if it causes no problems. However, some people with this extra bone develop a painful condition known as accessory navicular syndrome when the bone and/or posterior tibial tendon are aggravated. This can result from any of the following. Trauma, as in a foot or ankle sprain. Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear rubbing against the extra bone. Excessive activity or overuse.

Symptoms

A visible bony lump on the inner part of the foot, towards the middle, just above the arch of the foot. Redness, swelling, and sensitivity of the bony prominence. Pain or throbbing in the middle of the foot and the arch. Difficulty with foot movement and activity. Possible skin callous or skin irritation caused by footwear rubbing over the lump. Not everyone who has an accessory navicular will develop these problems. When problems do occur, they may begin in early adolescence. The obvious indication is a painful bump on the inside of the foot, which hurts to touch, and causes problems that gradually become worse, and which are aggravated by activity, walking, etc., leading to all the problems discussed here. Pain may be worse towards the end of the day, and continue into the night.

Diagnosis

To diagnose accessory navicular syndrome, medical staff ask about the patient?s activities and symptoms. They will examine the foot for irritation or swelling. Medical staff evaluate the bone structure, muscle, joint motion, and the patient?s gait. X-rays can usually confirm the diagnosis. MRI or other imaging tests may be used to determine any irritation or damage to soft-tissue structures such as tendons or ligaments. Because navicular accessory bone irritation can lead to bunions, heel spurs and plantar fasciitis, it?s important to seek treatment.

Non Surgical Treatment

Using PRP treatments, orthotics, proper running shoes and physical therapy should do the trick. No long recovery, no long down time. My runners and athletes are usually back to their sport pain free within a month. The key is eliminating the syndrome, not the bone (or cartilage).

Accessory Navicular

Surgical Treatment

The above non-surgical options should be enough to treat accessory navicular syndrome. If they fail, a surgery would be necessary to remove the extra bone that has been causing the problems. The most common procedure for this condition is known as the Kidner procedure where a small incision is made over the navicular bone. The accessory navicular is identified and dissected free from the posterior tibial tendon. The posterior tibial tendon is then reattached to the remaining navicular bone.

2 months ago

Exercises For Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Overview

The accessory navicular is an extra piece of bone or cartilage just above the arch on the inside of the foot. It sits next to the navicular tarsal, which gives it its name, where the posterior tibial tendon attaches to the bone before continuing to the underside of the arch. The little bone is a congenital anomaly, you are born with it. If the extra tissue doesn?t cause any problems, you may never know it is there. You can, however, develop the painful condition called accessory navicular syndrome. This occurs when the extra bone or the posterior tibial tendon surrounding it becomes irritated. Trauma from a sprain, friction from footwear, and overuse can all inflame the tissues.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes

Like all painful conditions, ANS has a root cause. The cause could be the accessory navicular bone itself producing irritation from shoes or too much activity. Often, however, it is related to injury of one of the structures that attach to the navicular bone. Structures that attach to the navicular bone include abductor hallucis muscle, plantar calcaneonavicular ligament (spring ligament) parts of the deltoid ligament, posterior tibial tendon.

Symptoms

The main symptom of an aggravated accessory navicular is pain, particularly in the instep. Walking can sometimes be difficult, and tight shoes may worsen the condition.

Diagnosis

Your podiatrist will most likely diagnose accessory navicular syndrome by making a visual study of the area, checking whether the shape of your foot and your ability to move it indicate there?s an accessory navicular lurking around. He or she may push on the prominence on your foot to check to see if it hurts, and may ask you to walk around in order to ascertain how your gait is affected. In order to get a certain diagnosis, your podiatrist will need some way to see the inside of your foot, which will most likely involve getting X-rays, or possibly an MRI or some other scan of your foot?s interior.

Non Surgical Treatment

In order to strengthen your muscles to prevent further injury and to provide support to the foot, your podiatrist may also outline a physical therapy routine and prescribe orthotics. Orthotics will provide support to the arch of your foot, although they must be carefully crafted in order to make room for that pesky extra bone you?ve got poking about.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment

In my experience, the Modified Kidner procedure is one of the most reliable operations for reducing arch pain associated with an accessory navicular bone (a.k.a. os tibial externum). You can also use this procedure to treat a prominence at the inner aspect of the arch, which has been caused by an enlarged navicular bone. The most common patients to visit our office with these problems are between the ages of 8 and 15 and are involved in activities like ice skating, ballet and soccer.

2 months ago

Exercises To Help Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Overview

The navicular bone of the foot is one of the small bones on the mid-foot. The bone is located at the instep, the arch at the middle of the foot. One of the larger tendons of the foot, called the posterior tibial tendon, attaches to the navicular before continuing under the foot and into the forefoot. This tendon is a tough band of tissue that helps hold up the arch of the foot. If there is an accessory navicular, it is located in the instep where the posterior tibial tendon attaches to the real navicular bone.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes

The syndrome may result from any of the following, previous trauma such as a foot or ankle sprain. Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear causing friction against the bone. Strain from overuse or excessive activity.

Symptoms

Adolescence is a common time for the symptoms to first appear. This is a time when bones are maturing and cartilage is developing into bone. Sometimes, however, the symptoms do not occur until adulthood. The signs and symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome include A visible bony prominence on the midfoot (the inner side of the foot, just above the arch) Redness and swelling of the bony prominence. Vague pain or throbbing in the midfoot and arch, usually occurring during or after periods of activity.

Diagnosis

To diagnose accessory navicular syndrome, the foot and ankle surgeon will ask about symptoms and examine the foot, looking for skin irritation or swelling. The doctor may press on the bony prominence to assess the area for discomfort. Foot structure, muscle strength, joint motion, and the way the patient walks may also be evaluated. X-rays are usually ordered to confirm the diagnosis. If there is ongoing pain or inflammation, an MRI or other advanced imaging tests may be used to further evaluate the condition.

Non Surgical Treatment

Ideally, getting rid of the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome will involve soothing the inflammation and irritation in your foot. So, for starters, your podiatrist may have you rest the area, allowing the inflamed tendon and bone to heal. This may be accomplished by wearing a cast or boot designed to keep you from moving the problem area. Your podiatrist may also suggest using ice to reduce the swelling and inflammation, and anti-inflammatory medications (like ibuprofen, or sometimes a cortisone shot or other steroid medication).

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment

If non-surgical treatment fails to relieve the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome, surgery may be appropriate. Surgery may involve removing the accessory bone, reshaping the area, and repairing the posterior tibial tendon to improve its function. This extra bone is not needed for normal foot function.

2 months ago

Does Accessory Navicular Syndrome Always Call For Surgery

Overview

The accessory navicular is an extra piece of bone or cartilage just above the arch on the inside of the foot. It sits next to the navicular tarsal, which gives it its name, where the posterior tibial tendon attaches to the bone before continuing to the underside of the arch. The little bone is a congenital anomaly, you are born with it. If the extra tissue doesn?t cause any problems, you may never know it is there. You can, however, develop the painful condition called accessory navicular syndrome. This occurs when the extra bone or the posterior tibial tendon surrounding it becomes irritated. Trauma from a sprain, friction from footwear, and overuse can all inflame t

2 months ago

Accessory Ossicle Navicular Treatment

Overview

An accessory navicular is defined as an extra bone in the foot, and oftentimes it causes moderate to severe discomfort. Depending on the severity, your doctor may recommend a non-surgical treatment to alleviate the pain, or surgery if treatment doesn?t decrease symptoms.

Accessory Navicular

Causes

It is commonly believed that the posterior tibial tendon loses its vector of pull to heighten the arch. As the posterior muscle contracts, the tendon is no longer pulling straight up on the navicular but must course around the prominence of bone and first pull medially before pulling upward. In addition, the enlarged bones may irritate and damage the insertional area of the posterior tibial tendon, making it less functional. Therefore, the presence of the accessory navicular bone does contribute to posterior tibial dysfunction.

Symptoms

Adolescence is a common time for the symptoms to first appear. This is a time when bones are maturing and cartilage is developing into bone. Sometimes, however, the symptoms do not occur until adulthood. The signs and symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome include a visible bony prominence on the midfoot (the inner side of the foot, just above the arch) Redness and swelling of the bony prominence, Vague pain or throbbing in the midfoot and arch, usually occurring during or after periods of activity.

Diagnosis

The diagnosis begins with a complete history and physical examination by your surgeon. Usually the condition is suggested by the history and the tenderness over the area of the navicular. X-rays will usually be required to allow the surgeon see the accessory navicular. Generally no other tests are required.

Non Surgical Treatment

Many individuals with symptomatic accessory naviculars can be managed successfully without surgery. Standard non-surgical treatment includes shoes that are soft around the inside of the ankle can allow for any excess prominence of bone. Therefore, it is recommended that either shoes with plenty of padding and space in the ankle area are purchased, or pre-owned shoes can be modified by a shoemaker to create extra space in this area. For example, many patients will get their ski boots expanded in the area around the prominence, minimizing irritation. In addition, a shoe with a stiff sole will help disperse force away from the arch of the foot during walking, thereby minimizing the force on the posterior tibial tendon. An off-the-shelf arch support may help decrease the stress applied by the posterior tibial tendon. If necessary, an ankle brace applied to provide more substantial support to the arch may be successful where a simple arch support fails.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment

If non-surgical treatment fails to relieve the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome, surgery may be appropriate. Surgery may involve removing the accessory bone, reshaping the area, and repairing the posterior tibial tendon to improve its function. This extra bone is not needed for normal foot function.